The myth of osteoporosis: blowing the whistle on the “epidemic”

When Dr. Victoria Seewaldt of Duke University School of Medicine reviewed a controversial new book about osteoporosis in the Journal of the American Medical Association* in 2005, she started off as an admitted skeptic. The review was for Gillian Sanson‘s book, The Myth of Osteoporosis: What Every Woman Should Know About Creating Bone Health. The book’s premise challenged almost every truism that most doctors believed – and may still believe – about osteoporosis.

Dr. Seewaldt is not only a physician, but also the daughter of an osteoporosis patient; her mother was diagnosed after fracturing a hip at age 72. She explained:

“Until her hip fracture, my mother was a ferocious shopper. Even in her early 70s, my mother would race down Fifth Avenue in New York City, shopping bags in hand, leaving me out of breath and begging for a rest.

“Then one day, my mother fractured her hip. Suddenly, our lives changed. For this reason, l initially approached Gillian Sanson’s book with significant reservations.”

But by the end of this book, Dr. Seewaldt found that her “reservations had turned to enthusiasm” Continue reading

When the little darlings won’t eat fresh fruit

It’s back-to-school time, warn the editors at Consumer Reports, and that means it’s time to answer an annual question:

“How tasty are lunch box options when your children won’t eat fresh fruit?”

The answer, say the kids who recently taste-tested packaged fruit cups for Consumer Reports:

“It depends.”

Let me interrupt this fascinating bit of science for full disclosure: as a mother of two (one of whom was only rarely picky, the other a bottomless pit of imminent starvation), I feel compelled to say that any kid of mine who would dare to advise me that they “won’t eat fresh fruit” would be going hungry. Continue reading

Are you being “over-diagnosed”?

According to a trio of widely published American researchers, many of us are “over-diagnosed” by being labelled with a medical condition that will never cause us any symptoms or premature death. We are, they tell us, mistakenly swallowing the popular conviction that early detection of everything is always for the best.

Their book, Over-diagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health, claims that over-diagnosis is in fact one of medicine’s biggest problems, causing millions of people to become patients unnecessarily, producing untold harm, and wasting vast amounts of resources in the name of disease mongering. Continue reading